6 Interesting Funny Commands From Linux (Fun In The Terminal)

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In our last articles to follow, we’ve shown some useful articles on some fun Linux commands that show that Linux isn’t as complex as it seems and can be fun once we know how to use it. The Linux command line can do any complex task very easily and perfectly, and can be interesting and joyful.

  • 20 fun commands from Linux – Part I.
  • Fun in the Linux Terminal – Play around with the word and character count
Funny Linux commands

The former post has 20 fun Linux commands / scripts (and subcommands) that our readers will really appreciate. The other post, albeit not as popular as the former, includes commands / scripts and customizations that allow you to play around with text files, words, and strings.

This post aims to bring along some new fun commands and one-liner scripts that you will be excited about.

1. pv command

You may have seen simulated text in movies. It appears as it is typed in real time. Wouldn’t it be nice if you can achieve such an effect in the terminal?

This can be done by installing the ‘pv‘Command in your Linux system with the’suitable‘ or ‘yummy‘ Tool. Let’s do the ‘pv‘Command as shown.

$ sudo apt install pv  [On Debian/Ubuntu & Mint]
$ sudo yum install pv  [On CentOS/RHEL 7]
$ sudo dnf install pv  [On CentOS/RHEL 8 & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S pv    [On Arch Linux]
$ sudo pkg_add -v pv   [On FreeBSD]

If, ‘pv‘Command has been successfully installed on your system, let’s try running the following one-line command to see the real-time text effect on the screen.

$ echo "Tecmint[dot]com is a community of Linux Nerds and Geeks" | pv -qL 10 
Install pv command
pv command in action

note: The ‘Q‘Option means’quiet‘, no output information and option’L.‘means the transfer limit of bytes per second. The numerical value can be adjusted in both directions (must be an integer) in order to obtain the desired text simulation.

[ You might also like: How to Monitor Progress of (Copy/Backup/Compress) Data using ‘pv’ Command ]

2. Toilet order

How about printing framed text in a terminal with a one line script command ‘Toilet‘. Again, you have to a ‘Toilet‘Command installed on your system, if not use apt or yum to install it.

$ sudo apt install toilet  [On Debian/Ubuntu & Mint]
$ sudo yum install toilet  [On CentOS/RHEL 7]
$ sudo dnf install toilet  [On CentOS/RHEL 8 & Fedora]
$ sudo yay -S toilet       [On Arch Linux]
$ sudo pkg_add -v toilet   [On FreeBSD]

After the installation, do the following:

$ while true; do echo “$(date | toilet -f term -F border –Tecmint)”; sleep 1; done
Install toilet on Linux
Toilet command in action

note: The above script must be stopped with the Ctrl + z Key.

3. Rig command

This command generates a random identity and address each time. To run this command you must ‘rig‘with apt or yum.

$ sudo apt install rig  [On Debian/Ubuntu & Mint]
$ sudo yum install rig  [On CentOS/RHEL 7]
$ sudo dnf install rig  [On CentOS/RHEL 8 & Fedora]
$ sudo yay -S rig       [On Arch Linux]
$ sudo pkg_add -v rig   [On FreeBSD]

After the installation, do the following:

# rig
Install the rig on Linux
Rig command in action

4. aview command

How about displaying an image in ASCII format on the terminal? We must have a package ‘a sight‘installed, just apt or yum it.

$ sudo apt install aview  [On Debian/Ubuntu & Mint]
$ sudo yum install aview  [On CentOS/RHEL 7]
$ sudo dnf install aview  [On CentOS/RHEL 8 & Fedora]
$ sudo yay -S aview       [On Arch Linux]
$ sudo pkg_add -v aview   [On FreeBSD]

I have a picture called ‘Elephant.jpg‘in my current working directory and would like to display it on the terminal in ASCII format.

$ asciiview elephant.jpg -driver curses 
aview command in action
aview command in action

5. xeyes command

In the last article we introduced a command ‘Well‘, which Jerry attaches with a mouse pointer and chases after him again and again. A similar program ‘xeyes‘is a graphical program and as soon as you fire the command you will see two monster eyes tracking your movement.

$ sudo apt install x11-apps  [On Debian/Ubuntu & Mint]
$ sudo yum install xeyes  [On CentOS/RHEL 7]
$ sudo dnf install xeyes  [On CentOS/RHEL 8 & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S xorg-xeyes    [On Arch Linux]
$ sudo pkg_add -v xeyes   [On FreeBSD]

After the installation, do the following:

$ xeyes
Install xeyes on Linux
xeyes command in action

6. Cowsay command

Remember the last time we introduced a command that is useful in outputting the text you want with an animated character cow? What if you want other animals instead of a cow?

$ sudo apt install cowsay  [On Debian/Ubuntu & Mint]
$ sudo yum install cowsay  [On CentOS/RHEL 7]
$ sudo dnf install cowsay  [On CentOS/RHEL 8 & Fedora]
$ sudo pacman -S cowsay    [On Arch Linux]
$ sudo pkg_add -v cowsay   [On FreeBSD]

Check a list of available animals.

$ cowsay -l 

How about Elephant in ASCII Snake?

$ cowsay -f elephant-in-snake Tecmint is Best 
Install Cowsay on Linux
Cowsay command in action

How about an elephant in ASCII goat?

$ cowsay -f gnu Tecmint is Best 
Female cow in action
Female cow in action

That’s all for now. I’ll come back with another interesting article. Until then, stay up to date and connected to Tecmint. Don’t forget to leave us your valuable feedback in the comments below.

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